Thursday, September 26, 2013

Heraion of Samos . . . Ancient Sanctuary!!

Photos by Jack Waldron
The Heraion of Samos was one of the most important sanctuaries if ancient Greece.  According to ancient myth, the goddess Hera was born beneath a willow tree on the banks of the river Imbrassos.  Pictured above is half of a column of the great Temple of Hera, built in 460 BC (larger than the original, which was built between 570-560 BC under the supervision of the architect Rhoicus and the artist Theodoros).  An additional row of columns was added to the new temple, which brought the total to 155.


The giant alter (one corner pictured above) was built in the 8th century BC.

*All photos and content property of Jack Waldron (photos may not be used without written permission)

Kos and the Ancient Asklepieion!

Photos by Jack Waldron
Above, a picture of the 2nd terrace of the Asklepieion from the 3rd terrace, with the remains of a temple in the Corinthian order on the right, and the Ionic Temple of Asklepios on the left.  
On the 3rd terrace of the ancient Asklepieion of Kos, is the Doric Temple of Aslkepios (pictured above).  The Kerme Gulf with mainland Turkey in the background is hard to beat for a resting stop in this most important site.  Below is an ancient water pipe on the 3rd terrace.
Below, the Ionic Temple of Asklepios.
Above, the temple in the Corinthian order on the 2nd terrace.  Below, structural sima lay on the 2nd terrace.
Above, the retaining wall on the 1st terrace of the Asklepieion photographed from the southeast corner, with statue fragments ornamenting the grounds.  Below, an ancient spring in the retaining wall still fills its pool from the original marble decoration.
Below, the retaining wall on the 1st terrace of the Asklepieion photographed from the northwest corner, with fragments of the Hellenistic Stoa and ancient toilets in the foreground.
Above, the restored 3rd century AD ode ion in Kos Town.


*All photos and content property of Jack Waldron (photos may not be used without written permission)

Old Rhodes Town and Acropolis!

Photos by Jack Waldron
On my last day in Rhodes Town before jumping on the ferry to Samos, I made a couple critical stops with regard to the mission of Bike Classical.  One of those stops (pictured above), was the purported location of one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, the Colossus of Rhodes, the statue of the Greek Titan Helios, upon which the Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor was modeled.
Old Rhodes Town is the site of 3rd century Temple of Aphrodite.  This is one of the few remaining ancient ruins within Old Rhodes Town (pictured above and below).
Pictured above (from the Acropolis of Rhodes) are the restored 2nd century AD stadium, with the reconstructed theater in foreground, which was the site of lectures by the Rhodes School of Rhetoric.  Below, the extent of the stadium.
The Temple of Pythian Apollo on the Acropolis of Rhodes.  

*All photos and content property of Jack Waldron (photos may not be used without written permission)

Friday, September 13, 2013

Ancient Kamiros, Rhodes and Free Camping!

Photos by Jack Waldron
Above, sunset from my free camping on the beach just below ancient Kamiros.  The trail was littered with some wonderful pottery shards!!  Below, two photos of the ancient Doric temple in ancient Kamiros.
Below, a photo of the center of ancient Kamiros.  Top left of the photo, the Sanctuary Of The Gods, where statues once adorned the site sacred site.  Center right, Fountain Square and the late Hellenistic fountain.
Pictured above, the columns of the front of the late Hellenistic fountain.  Below, the Sanctuary Of The Gods.
The main street that runs through the center of ancient Kamiros, lined with the remains of houses.
Below, the Archaic cistern ear the acropolis of ancient Kamiros.

*All photos and content property of Jack Waldron (photos may not be used without written permission)

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Rhodes! Ancient Lindos

Photos by Jack Waldron
I arrived in Rhodes Town by ferry from Sitia, Crete at three o'clock in the morning, made my way around the fort walls, which were constructed by the christian crusaders (or, their slaves), found a bench on the harbor, and waited for Helios to share the warmth of the Dodecanese.
Upon sunrise, I set out on a sixty-five kilometer ride south, along the east coast to the ancient city of Lindos (acropolis of Lindos, pictured below from the south).  Below the acropolis is the modern town of Lindos, and in the center-right of the picture is the ancient theater.  I cycled four kilometers past Lindos to Pefki beach, where I camped for free (pictured above).
A diagram of the sanctuary of Lindos during the archaic phase is pictured below, and further down is the sanctuary during the early Hellenistic phase. 
Below, the temple of Athena Lindia, located at the top of the acropolis in the main sacred precinct.
Above, is the left end of the large Hellenistic stoa, while below is the center of the stoa ( the right end of stoa is under restoration/reconstruction).  
If the restored structures appear to be in very fine condition, well, they are, and the reason for the use of so many new members is explained below:
Above, a semicircular exedra, of which there are two on the acropolis.  
Above, a dedication list of those who donated funds to make three gold wreaths for the deities Athena, Zeus and Nike (read more below).
The trireme (pictured below) lay at the bottom of the stairs to the entrance of ancient Lindos.  Hewn out of the rock wall by the famous sculptor Pythocrates, a statue of Hagesandros, priest of Poseidon, once stood on the deck of the ship.
Below, Back to Rhodes Town, and then on to ancient Kamiros, and the west coast.

*All photos and content property of Jack Waldron (photos may not be used without written permission)